Join hundreds of Trout Unlimited members, volunteers and staff at our 2018 Annual Meeting in Redding, California from Sept. 19 - 23. The TU Annual Meeting is a powerful celebration of all we've accomplished together in the past year towards our mission to conserve, protect and restore North America's cold water fisheries and their watersheds. Along with important business to conduct, the Annual Meeting includes many special activities, Details

This is a unique opportunity to have access to the annual meeting in our home state. See how the organization works. Get ideas for your implementation. take advantage of the fishing opportunities.

Sportsmen and women pay the bulk of the money to fund state wildlife agencies. Is it time for other outdoor users to pony up, too? Randy Scholfield, TU’s director of communications for the Southwest, has some thoughts for change. A Colorado fishing license is his Golden Ticket, after all—the Keys to the Kingdom—bestowing on me rights to fish our state’s world-class public waters. It’s an incredible bargain, even with the fee increase, and a smart investment in the future health of these irreplaceable resources. But one thought kind of nags at me: Why should anglers and hunters bear so much of the financial burden of supporting our state’s fish and wildlife habitat? Read More

Lahontan RecoveryHelen Neville has rarely been inspired performing grant reporting. But in a recent effort to compile progress toward metrics for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Lahontan Cutthroat Trout Keystone Initiative, which funds much of TU’s work on LCT, she had one of those wonderful “Wow!” moments in seeing—distilled into just a few numbers—what TU has been able to bring to the table for LCT conservation since the Initiative’s inception in 2010. Read the Full Story.

BristolBay3The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has just opened its first public comment period to receive input on how it will evaluate Pebble's application to build a massive mine in the headwaters of Bristol Bay.

Please tell the Corps of Engineers that Pebble's latest mine plan would be catastrophic for Bristol Bay's fisheries, is inadequate, and should be rejected.

Send a Message.

Pebble Wrapper Pebble WrapperSoon, we are expecting the opening of another national comment period related to the Pebble mine proposal. This will be unlike any public process Alaska has seen before: it will be a rushed attempt to fast track what has become one of the most controversial projects in our state’s history. Before this begins, we wanted to update you on recent news related to Bristol Bay.Soon. This will be unlike any public process Alaska has seen before: it will be a rushed attempt to fast track what has become one of the most controversial projects in our state’s history. In December, we finally got a look at one of Pebble's major permit applications. The mine plan laid out in the documents filed by Northern Dynasty Minerals with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers makes two things abundantly clear: 1. Pebble cannot protect clean water and salmon in Bristol Bay while operating their mine. And worse...2. The current plan filed by the company is only phase one.

See the Pebble Fact Sheet to understand the plan content.

Historic records reveal abundant numbers of steelhead once migrated from the Pacific Ocean to Southern California's coastal waterways in search of spawning grounds. The presence of steelhead in southern California is memorialized in places like Steelhead Park, which sits along the the Los Angeles River near Dodger Stadium. In the early 1900s, anglers visited this park in hopes of filling their creel with the formidable fish.

Images from the early twentieth century also portray successful steelhead fishing in Orange County at San Juan Creek, and in San Diego County in lower San Mateo Creek and lower Santa Margarita River.

Today, steelhead are nearly non-existent in Southern California - a strikingly different picture than the one painted by historic accounts. See The Story of Recovery.

BristolBay2Pebble mine threatens one of the world's last great salmon fisheries. North America's salmon powerhouse, Bristol Bay, Alaska, is threatened by the massive proposed gold and copper mine. Working closely with commercial fishermen, tribes, sportsmen and women, local businesses and many others across the country Trout Unlimited works to protect these iconic and productive rivers and the people they support.

Progress has been made in prior years but the Pebble Mine is filing for permits. Review the current activity and take action now.

YellowCreekHandpicking places for protection is becoming the conservation norm. As mass extinctions and climate flux confront ecosystems with the most unpredictable challenges the natural world has seen in millennia, scientists and land managers are discarding their efforts to resist all change. Cindy Noble, chair of Trout Unlimited’s Feather River Chapter reports “We don’t want to dump a bunch of time and money into a problem we can never fix, We are not going to do this the stupid way.”

Assessing where fish seem to be thriving, and where threats are most prevalent, will allow scientists to prioritize their efforts to protect and restore aquatic habitat in the upper Feather River region. The project is part of Trout Unlimited’s mission to sustain California’s cold-water fisheries. Read the full story to understand the work.

BDASquawCreekBeaver Dam Analogs, BDAs, have become popular in meadow restoration. Our chapter has worked with them in Audrain Meadow. Simultaneously they have contributed to a significant restoration in Squaw Valley.

Trout Unlimited believes that conservation work begins with people. This belief was affirmed again when over 75 volunteers gathered recently to renew one of the Lake Tahoe region’s most popular places—Squaw Valley—and begin the process of restoring its namesake stream to a more natural state. Squaw Creek is that stream. Once home to native Lahontan cutthroat trout, it is now the focus of a partnership-driven restoration project with TU at its heart. Read full story

YouthMembersAre you already aware of the special Stream Explorer and TU Teen memberships available for young folks? Do you have a youngster that would benefit from joining TU? Chapters can purchase youth memberships at a bulk rate for just $8 apiece. Regular memberships are $12 for Stream Explorer (under age 12) and $14 for TU Teens. Any time your chapter wants to sign up six or more youth, you qualify for the bulk rate. This is a great way to get youth on your roster and begin including them in your events.

Send an e-mail to  , or complete the contact us form in the About Us page. if you have a candidate. We will collect the names and information and process the memberships. The board may choose to cover the cost of membership. A one-year membership includes a quarterly magazine, calendar, and membership card.

When you purchase a youth membership, a portion of your dollars go to support the Headwaters Youth Program. That's right, every youth membership purchased is a donation to supporting programs like Trout in the Classroom, STREAM Girls, TU Teen Summit, Summer Fly Fishing & Conservation Camps, and more.

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