EDTUlogonooseedtu.fish is the new domain name for our chapter web-site. The new site provides information on local fishing and chapter activities. A calendar of events will be maintained to provide notice of events. The site incorporates an important e-mail function to push information to the users.

User registration is required to receive notifications. This will also provide a method to get responses for participation in events.

Attend the December 4 meeting and receive guidance on registration and assistance in registering.

TroutCoverOur next chapter meeting will be on December 4. This will be the first of continuing bi-monthly meetings. The location of the meeting has not been established. The Board is working on the feature speaker. Several items of business relate to future projects, meeting schedules, communications and the new edtu.fish web-site.

 Future meetings will  be every other month. Board meetings will be held on the interim months.

Signage is planned for the middle section of the South Fork of  the American River. Work is also ongoing on promoting new regulations to establish a trophy trout reach on the river.

A focus on youth angling and membership will be implemented.

The Board is developing a plan to hold a film festival

Communication will be accomplished through the web-site and include e-mail to registered members  and other users. Registration will be required to receive future mailings and notifications of meetings, events and projects.

Sportsmen and women pay the bulk of the money to fund state wildlife agencies. Is it time for other outdoor users to pony up, too? Randy Scholfield, TU’s director of communications for the Southwest, has some thoughts for change. A Colorado fishing license is his Golden Ticket, after all—the Keys to the Kingdom—bestowing on me rights to fish our state’s world-class public waters. It’s an incredible bargain, even with the fee increase, and a smart investment in the future health of these irreplaceable resources. But one thought kind of nags at me: Why should anglers and hunters bear so much of the financial burden of supporting our state’s fish and wildlife habitat? Read More

Lahontan RecoveryHelen Neville has rarely been inspired performing grant reporting. But in a recent effort to compile progress toward metrics for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Lahontan Cutthroat Trout Keystone Initiative, which funds much of TU’s work on LCT, she had one of those wonderful “Wow!” moments in seeing—distilled into just a few numbers—what TU has been able to bring to the table for LCT conservation since the Initiative’s inception in 2010. Read the Full Story.

BristolBay3The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has just opened its first public comment period to receive input on how it will evaluate Pebble's application to build a massive mine in the headwaters of Bristol Bay.

Please tell the Corps of Engineers that Pebble's latest mine plan would be catastrophic for Bristol Bay's fisheries, is inadequate, and should be rejected.

Send a Message.

Pebble Wrapper Pebble WrapperSoon, we are expecting the opening of another national comment period related to the Pebble mine proposal. This will be unlike any public process Alaska has seen before: it will be a rushed attempt to fast track what has become one of the most controversial projects in our state’s history. Before this begins, we wanted to update you on recent news related to Bristol Bay.Soon. This will be unlike any public process Alaska has seen before: it will be a rushed attempt to fast track what has become one of the most controversial projects in our state’s history. In December, we finally got a look at one of Pebble's major permit applications. The mine plan laid out in the documents filed by Northern Dynasty Minerals with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers makes two things abundantly clear: 1. Pebble cannot protect clean water and salmon in Bristol Bay while operating their mine. And worse...2. The current plan filed by the company is only phase one.

See the Pebble Fact Sheet to understand the plan content.

Historic records reveal abundant numbers of steelhead once migrated from the Pacific Ocean to Southern California's coastal waterways in search of spawning grounds. The presence of steelhead in southern California is memorialized in places like Steelhead Park, which sits along the the Los Angeles River near Dodger Stadium. In the early 1900s, anglers visited this park in hopes of filling their creel with the formidable fish.

Images from the early twentieth century also portray successful steelhead fishing in Orange County at San Juan Creek, and in San Diego County in lower San Mateo Creek and lower Santa Margarita River.

Today, steelhead are nearly non-existent in Southern California - a strikingly different picture than the one painted by historic accounts. See The Story of Recovery.

BristolBay2Pebble mine threatens one of the world's last great salmon fisheries. North America's salmon powerhouse, Bristol Bay, Alaska, is threatened by the massive proposed gold and copper mine. Working closely with commercial fishermen, tribes, sportsmen and women, local businesses and many others across the country Trout Unlimited works to protect these iconic and productive rivers and the people they support.

Progress has been made in prior years but the Pebble Mine is filing for permits. Review the current activity and take action now.

YellowCreekHandpicking places for protection is becoming the conservation norm. As mass extinctions and climate flux confront ecosystems with the most unpredictable challenges the natural world has seen in millennia, scientists and land managers are discarding their efforts to resist all change. Cindy Noble, chair of Trout Unlimited’s Feather River Chapter reports “We don’t want to dump a bunch of time and money into a problem we can never fix, We are not going to do this the stupid way.”

Assessing where fish seem to be thriving, and where threats are most prevalent, will allow scientists to prioritize their efforts to protect and restore aquatic habitat in the upper Feather River region. The project is part of Trout Unlimited’s mission to sustain California’s cold-water fisheries. Read the full story to understand the work.

BDASquawCreekBeaver Dam Analogs, BDAs, have become popular in meadow restoration. Our chapter has worked with them in Audrain Meadow. Simultaneously they have contributed to a significant restoration in Squaw Valley.

Trout Unlimited believes that conservation work begins with people. This belief was affirmed again when over 75 volunteers gathered recently to renew one of the Lake Tahoe region’s most popular places—Squaw Valley—and begin the process of restoring its namesake stream to a more natural state. Squaw Creek is that stream. Once home to native Lahontan cutthroat trout, it is now the focus of a partnership-driven restoration project with TU at its heart. Read full story

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