Our final meeting before summer will be the 8th annual member appreciation meeting at the Jack Russell Farm Brewery, 2380 Larson Rd, Camino. This will be another pot luck get together with guided trips and high end rod/reel combo being auctioned off with proceeds going to EDTU Chapter projects.

Bring your favorite recipe and fish tales to share with your friends new and old. It is a good opportunity for talk and to take home some good gifts.

Gathering will start at 4:00 with beer available from Jack Russell. Raffle items will be displayed and tickets will be available. Dinner will occur as food is displayed. The raffle for gifts will follow dinner. There will probably be a fly tying contest as well.

BristolBay

Clean water and healthy fisheries are under threat like never before. But with great threat, comes great opportunity: This is yours. Act today and be the voice that protected water for this generation and the next.

THREAT: Pebble Mine, a massive open pit mine at the headwaters of Bristol Bay.

THREAT: A proposal to significantly reduce protections for headwater streams.

Here's where you can help

TroutCamp19TU California is excited to announce our annual youth trout camp in Truckee. The camp is a two-day event for participants ages 10-12, who will learn the most important elements of fly fishing, from casting and fly tying to insect identification and conservation ethics. Dates for this year's camp are June 8th and 9th at two private lakes in the Truckee area. Participants will get the opportunity to receive instruction from local fly fishing expert volunteers in the beautiful northern Sierra Nevada. No experience is required for participants. Anyone interested in applying should email to receive the short application -- participation is limited to 20 campers. It's going to be a great time, and we hope to see you there!

PebbleMineNo

A new study commissioned by a Bristol Bay seafood marketing group paints a doomsday scenario if the bulk tailings dam at the proposed Pebble mine ever suffered a catastrophic breach, an outcome the U.S Army Corps of Engineers has called very remote and one the mine developer has taken steps to avoid.

Billions of gallons of mud would smother valley bottoms, covering vast stretches of salmon habitat, according to an executive summary released Friday. Finely ground-up waste material from mining would travel downstream and spill into Bristol Bay more than 200 river miles from the mine site, threatening the valuable salmon fishery.

“Given the fine-grained nature of the material, it is extremely likely that these tailings would continue to Bristol Bay, where they would eventually settle out in the Nushagak River estuary,” the summary says.

The impact could last decades. Read the Summation of Findings. Comment to the Corps of Engineers.

Friends of the River Director Ron Stork identifies many current actions by the government which endanger our California Rivers. Read his February "River Currents" .

NaturalResources

Thanks to the bipartisan work of Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Maria Cantwell (D-WA), and other senators, the Natural Resources Management Act passed the Senate Tuesday evening (Feb. 12). The bill bundles together over 100 pieces of legislation that in many cases have languished for years.

Among other things, the bill permanently authorizes the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a popular program for acquiring new public lands and access for hunting and fishing, without costing taxpayers a dime. The bill also protects iconic rivers such as the North Umpqua, Rogue, Chetco and Elk in Oregon, and headwater streams to the Yellowstone River in Montana.

Read More

BristolBay2

Pebble Mine is not dead. Pebble is running a massive and misleading PR campaign as they forge ahead in their permitting process. Their first major permit is currently under review. If it is granted, it will trigger dozens of additional permits to be issued, and Pebble could be given a green light to begin mining the headwaters of Bristol Bay.

As their permitting continues, Pebble mine backers are on a mission to gain support from Alaskans around the state. They’re doubling down on a robust PR stunt full of misrepresentations and outright lies about the benefits and impacts of their mine They want to distract you from the truth: the science remains crystal clear that Pebble mine poses immense, irreparable risk to the thriving fishery in Bristol Bay.

We’re going to need your help at every step of the way over the next 12-18 months to ensure that our decision makers say NO to Pebble’s key permits. There will soon be another, very important opportunity for us to weigh in on Pebble's permit application. We will let you know when that comment period opens. When it does, please tell your friends and neighbors to join you in submitting a comment.

To summarize, here’s what’s at play: Bristol Bay is a world class fishery, perhaps the greatest wild salmon fishery in the world. Time and time again, Americans, Alaskans, and the communities of Bristol Bay have overwhelmingly said NO to a mine in Bristol Bay. As currently designed, Pebble would exceed the levels of impacts that the United States EPA has already stated would cause significant and unacceptable impacts to the waters and fisheries of Bristol Bay. Yes, the size of the mine proposed is a mere fraction of the size of the mine potential, but the initial permit would open the region up to millions of additional acres to be mined. 

Not only has Pebble refused to provide an economic feasibility study of their mine, their permit application to the United States Army Corps of Engineers is woefully incomplete and only covers a small portion of what Pebble tells investors is possible to mine in Bristol Bay. In the end, Pebble will do and say anything to mislead Alaskans and rush through the permitting process. But after all these years, nothing about the crux of this proposal has changed. The impacts to the fisheries, economies, and communities of the region will be profound and irreversible.

EDTUlogonooseedtu.fish is the new domain name for our chapter web-site. The new site provides information on local fishing and chapter activities. A calendar of events will be maintained to provide notice of events. The site incorporates an important e-mail function to push information to the users.

User registration is required to receive notifications. This will also provide a method to get responses for participation in events.

Attend the December 4 meeting and receive guidance on registration and assistance in registering.

Sportsmen and women pay the bulk of the money to fund state wildlife agencies. Is it time for other outdoor users to pony up, too? Randy Scholfield, TU’s director of communications for the Southwest, has some thoughts for change. A Colorado fishing license is his Golden Ticket, after all—the Keys to the Kingdom—bestowing on me rights to fish our state’s world-class public waters. It’s an incredible bargain, even with the fee increase, and a smart investment in the future health of these irreplaceable resources. But one thought kind of nags at me: Why should anglers and hunters bear so much of the financial burden of supporting our state’s fish and wildlife habitat? Read More

Lahontan RecoveryHelen Neville has rarely been inspired performing grant reporting. But in a recent effort to compile progress toward metrics for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Lahontan Cutthroat Trout Keystone Initiative, which funds much of TU’s work on LCT, she had one of those wonderful “Wow!” moments in seeing—distilled into just a few numbers—what TU has been able to bring to the table for LCT conservation since the Initiative’s inception in 2010. Read the Full Story.

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