YouthMembersAre you already aware of the special Stream Explorer and TU Teen memberships available for young folks? Do you have a youngster that would benefit from joining TU? Chapters can purchase youth memberships at a bulk rate for just $8 apiece. Regular memberships are $12 for Stream Explorer (under age 12) and $14 for TU Teens. Any time your chapter wants to sign up six or more youth, you qualify for the bulk rate. This is a great way to get youth on your roster and begin including them in your events.

Send an e-mail to  , or complete the contact us form in the About Us page. if you have a candidate. We will collect the names and information and process the memberships. The board may choose to cover the cost of membership. A one-year membership includes a quarterly magazine, calendar, and membership card.

When you purchase a youth membership, a portion of your dollars go to support the Headwaters Youth Program. That's right, every youth membership purchased is a donation to supporting programs like Trout in the Classroom, STREAM Girls, TU Teen Summit, Summer Fly Fishing & Conservation Camps, and more.

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Trout Unlimited John Muir Chapter, and Orvis are challenging the fly-fishing community to contribute to local conservation and enhancement through the Embrace-A-Stream program. The John Muir Chapter of TU has already been awarded $8000 toward restoration projects on Putah Creek. This grant can be increased dramatically if the project garners local contributions as well. Small contributions to this challenge will go a long way through competitive matching grants:

- Most Unique Donors - $5,000 prize
- Most Money Raised - $2,500 prize

- Most gifts of $25 or Higher - $1,500 prize

- Most gifts of $10 to $24.99 - $1,000 prize


Help support our local trophy wild trout water and make it a destination fishery! Contribute at https://embraceastream.org/projects/john-muir

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Ten years ago, on a river revered for its huge wild steelhead, more than a ton of dynamite reduced a 47-foot high dam to rubble.  At the time, it was the largest dam ever removed in the United States. It was also the first dam to be removed without first removing entrained silt. The operation was a success in removing the silt within a few days and long term return of steelhead.

As with subsequent dam removal projects on rivers such as the Penobscot, Elwha and Carmel, it didn’t take long for migratory fishes such as salmon and steelhead to begin moving into the upper reaches of the Sandy River, habitat they hadn’t reached for more than a century.

But would taking out the dam lead to a real boost in anadromous fish numbers in the system? This October, in a 10-year retrospective, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife looked at the numbers and offered the answer: an “unqualified yes.” The action was also revealing in that all of the silt was removed in days with the river returning to normalcy.

Read the full story.

The El Dorado National Forest will begin burning in the Caples Creek watershed the week of November 1. This burn will begin a forest restoration project that has been ten years in discussion. The project will continue over ten years and accomplish thinning of the forest as well as removal of excess fuels loads. Forest Supervisor Lawrence Crabtree announced the project this week. Principals in development of the project have been Craig Thomas of the Forest Legacy and Duane Nelson, former district ranger of the Placerville district.

The Eldorado National Forest will burn169 acres approximately four miles northwest of Kirkwood if weather conditions allow as part of a multi-year ecological restoration project in partnership with El Dorado Irrigation District (EID) and the Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC). A total of 8,800 acres will be burned over the next 10-15 years to decrease the risk of wildfire in the biologically diverse Caples Creek watershed that provides a vital community water supply for 110,000 people in EID's service area. The area to be burned next week (Unit A1) is located on a ridge in the upper watershed near Buck Pasture and Hay Flat.

BristolBayNearly a decade of TU's hard work is at risk as the EPA is in the process of reviewing and considering rolling back critical protections to some of our nation's best trout and salmon streams.

STAND UP WITH TU
Tell the EPA to Maintain the Clean Water Rule and Protect Bristol Bay

Nearly a decade of TU's hard work is at risk as the EPA is in the process of reviewing and considering rolling back critical protections to some of our nation's best trout and salmon streams.

The Clean Water rule, which we all worked together to enact in 2015, did a good job of clarifying and restoring Clean Water Act protections for headwater streams and wetlands. The 2014 restrictions on Pebble Mine that the EPA proposed but never enacted would have provided critical support to our efforts to secure a strong future for a remarkable watershed that is important not only as a powerhouse for wild salmon, but also the engine for local and international economies.

This summer, President Trump directed his EPA to rescind the 2015 Clean Water Rule and revert back to a far less protective standard and this spring, the EPA struck a deal with the Canadian company behind the mine to reverse the mining restrictions that over a million Americans supported.

Both of the above efforts by the EPA have very limited windows for public comment – with the Clean Water Rule public comment period ending on Sept. 27 and the Bristol Bay comment period closing on Oct. 17.

We're asking all of our chapters and councils – and your members – to help us fill the EPA's inbox with support for the Clean Water Rule and Bristol Bay. Please take the following actions as volunteer leaders with TU

Please take action today: You can send a letter to the EPA using our Clean Water Rule online form – if every volunteer leader sends in a letter we will be flooding the EPA with nearly 4,000 comments!  

 

IMG 1103 800x600Four members of Trout Unlimited El Dorado joined with other groups to assist in restoration work on the Audrain Meadow. The work was done on August 29 and 30 in support of owner Dale Pierce. Beaver dam analogs, bda, created last year were repaired and extended to further water  retention in the meadow. 

Dams installed last year survived the severe winter and seasonal runoff with minimum damage. Dams were reported to be over topped with water during the spring. They were effective in retaining water in the meadow and sustained minimal damage.

The meadow appears very healthful after this winter. Grass has grown taller and more dense and filled many of the open channels seen last year. Vegetative growth and downfall is plentiful this year.

The project will continue to retain water in the meadow and correct the down cutting experienced in the last 60 years. Replacement of a culvert under the access road is a major item of future work.

Jann Williams, John Sikora,  Bill Burden, Pat Barron and Stan Backlund participated in the work.

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The Eel River is on the brink of disaster, its ocean-going fish species threatened with extinction, its nurturing estuary diked, drained and diminishing.

At the same time, this massive watershed in California’s northwest corner offers the state’s best hope of ensuring a future abundance of wild anadromous fish.

This paradox of the Eel, California’s third largest river system, is driving an urgency to save it while there’s still time. For the Eel’s diverse and often adversarial stakeholders, this is a rare and fleeting opportunity to set aside differences out of a common commitment to what they share.

 More

salmonA University of California and CaliforniaTrout study last month indicated that some species of salmon are in danger of going extinct by the end of this century. Their persistence in modern California is practically miraculous, given the profound alteration of rivers and streams.

To ensure these fish endure, with the added dimension of a changing climate, we must take strong steps. Salmon need help in the stream gravel where they hatch, the pools and floodplains where they grow, the Delta channels that carry them to the ocean, and the rivers they power up in order to spawn and die in the same gravel from which they emerged.

More

The American Sportfishing Association and Southwick Associates created a new series of one-page infographics for all 435 Congressional districts in all 50 states. The 2017 infographics provide fishing participation and economic data at the Congressional district level.

See California-District-4-2.pdf for data on our chapters district under Representative Tom McClintock.


The information in the report and infographics use data from the most recent U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, conducted in conjunction with the U.S. Census Bureau, as presented in ASA’s Sportfishing in America report. The study used mapping and population software to hone in on smaller geographic areas in a way that is particularly relevant to members of the U.S. House of Representatives.

See Economic Contributions for the whole report.

 

WesternWater

Article in The Christian Science Monitor by Zack Colman

In an innovative agreement, farmers have joined with environmental groups and state and federal officials to both increase water availability and restore the natural landscape. Although the plan focuses on just one section of the state, it is an agriculturally significant one – the Yakima Basin. And it’s comprehensive: The plan includes voluntary conservation programs, building new water-storage reservoirs, and adding structures to dams that would help fish seek cooler waters as they migrate upstream. The framework,​ in place at the state level since 2012, has begun to show promise, even though federal approval by the US Congress is still needed for full implementation.

Read The Full Story


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