BristolBay2Pebble mine threatens one of the world's last great salmon fisheries. North America's salmon powerhouse, Bristol Bay, Alaska, is threatened by the massive proposed gold and copper mine. Working closely with commercial fishermen, tribes, sportsmen and women, local businesses and many others across the country Trout Unlimited works to protect these iconic and productive rivers and the people they support.

Progress has been made in prior years but the Pebble Mine is filing for permits. Review the current activity and take action now.

YellowCreekHandpicking places for protection is becoming the conservation norm. As mass extinctions and climate flux confront ecosystems with the most unpredictable challenges the natural world has seen in millennia, scientists and land managers are discarding their efforts to resist all change. Cindy Noble, chair of Trout Unlimited’s Feather River Chapter reports “We don’t want to dump a bunch of time and money into a problem we can never fix, We are not going to do this the stupid way.”

Assessing where fish seem to be thriving, and where threats are most prevalent, will allow scientists to prioritize their efforts to protect and restore aquatic habitat in the upper Feather River region. The project is part of Trout Unlimited’s mission to sustain California’s cold-water fisheries. Read the full story to understand the work.

BDASquawCreekBeaver Dam Analogs, BDAs, have become popular in meadow restoration. Our chapter has worked with them in Audrain Meadow. Simultaneously they have contributed to a significant restoration in Squaw Valley.

Trout Unlimited believes that conservation work begins with people. This belief was affirmed again when over 75 volunteers gathered recently to renew one of the Lake Tahoe region’s most popular places—Squaw Valley—and begin the process of restoring its namesake stream to a more natural state. Squaw Creek is that stream. Once home to native Lahontan cutthroat trout, it is now the focus of a partnership-driven restoration project with TU at its heart. Read full story

YouthMembersAre you already aware of the special Stream Explorer and TU Teen memberships available for young folks? Do you have a youngster that would benefit from joining TU? Chapters can purchase youth memberships at a bulk rate for just $8 apiece. Regular memberships are $12 for Stream Explorer (under age 12) and $14 for TU Teens. Any time your chapter wants to sign up six or more youth, you qualify for the bulk rate. This is a great way to get youth on your roster and begin including them in your events.

Send an e-mail to  , or complete the contact us form in the About Us page. if you have a candidate. We will collect the names and information and process the memberships. The board may choose to cover the cost of membership. A one-year membership includes a quarterly magazine, calendar, and membership card.

When you purchase a youth membership, a portion of your dollars go to support the Headwaters Youth Program. That's right, every youth membership purchased is a donation to supporting programs like Trout in the Classroom, STREAM Girls, TU Teen Summit, Summer Fly Fishing & Conservation Camps, and more.

WashingtonWomenARE YOU PASSIONATE ABOUT HELPING OTHER WOMEN LEARN TO FISH? Are you a women wanting inclusion in the conservation, fishing and social aspects of Trout Unlimited? Trout Unlimited is jump starting their women's initiative across the state by identifying women volunteers for each of their many chapters.  The goal for each coordinator is to plan fun, educational events for new anglers and to connect current anglers. 

Many people would be intimidated by being the minority in a group, let alone the sole individual. I encourage you to think about what your experience was like at your first chapter interaction. Did you feel comfortable? Why did you decide to come? What keeps you coming back? Think about the answers to those questions and try to replicate the good and smooth over the gaps. Start a conversation at your chapter and maybe even consider filling the role of Women's Initiative Chair for your chapter. Take a look at other people's successes.

The Washington's Women's Initiative, led by Heather Hodson, is a great example. Heather and her collective of Women's Initiative Chapter Chairs are doing great things from women's social nights to casting clinics. Women who attend the clinics receive a free TU membership from a local TU Business and are followed-up with to invite them to upcoming chapter activities (and even step up to lead other women's events). You may check this out on their Facebook page WashingtonTroutUnlimitedWomen or Women of Trout Unlimited 

LiquidGoldLiquid Gold is a California Trout film that depicts the history of Golden Trout in California. This excellent presentation includes a two week back pack journey to discover the trout. The film captures the realities of the journey and put you on the scene. The 17 minute film is worth watching to capture the history, the habitat, the range, the geography, the journey and the experience. Watch the Film

Watching Liquid Gold puts you on "YouTube" where a series of similar films are displayed. Two of these are recommended and described here. Follow any of these links and you will be exposed to all of the series.

Enough is Enough portrays the history of the McCloud River, its historic fish, geographical protection of the site and of course the modern fishing experience.

Trout Fishing In The Sierras reports exploration of Twin Lakes near Bridgeport California. It doesn't carry the history of the prior films but presents opportunities in a familiar location.

FloatingOn July 15, the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources passed a bill, H.R. 3650 that would allow the disposal of 2 million acres of Forest Service land per state. This is an area larger than the Gallatin National Forest in Montana. More than all National Forest lands in Wisconsin. Greater than the National Forests of Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New York and Pennsylvania combined. This is twice the size of California's Six Rivers National Forest.

Two million acres of your National Forests per state – gone.

Certain lands, such as Congressionally designated Wilderness Areas, would be excluded, but the majority of America's public lands managed by the Forest Service would be eligible for liquidation.

And what would happen to these lands? They would go to individual states to be managed primarily for timber production without any consideration given to the 320 million Americans who currently own a stake in them. That is, if the lands aren't sold to private interests, like what is happening right now with the Elliot State Forest in Oregon.

The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Department of Commerce, PacificCorp, and the states of Oregon and California today signed an agreement that, following a process administered by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), is expected to remove four dams on the Klamath River by 2020, amounting to one of the largest river restoration efforts in the nation.

State and federal officials also signed a new, separate agreement with irrigation interests and other parties known as the 2016 Klamath Power and Facilities Agreement (KPFA). This agreement will help Klamath Basin irrigators avoid potentially adverse financial and regulatory impacts associated with the return of fish runs to the Upper Klamath Basin, which are anticipated after dams are removed.

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